Advanced Practical Course - Blockchain technology for public sector innovation (IN2106, IN4212)

Lecturer (assistant)
  • Helmut Krcmar [L]
  • Dian Balta
Number0000002996
TypePractical course
Duration6 SWS
TermSommersemester 2018
Language of instructionGerman
Position within curriculaSee TUMonline
DatesSee TUMonline

Dates

Course criteria & registration

See TUMonlineTo apply, you need to be registered as a student on TUMonline. The kick-off is mandatory. No-shows lose their space to the next in the waiting list. You can apply via the matching system. Please send a brief motivation letter (max 1 page, including your GitHub account if you have one) until 28.02.2018 – please indicate “[blockchain Praktikum]” in the subject! It will be considered for prioritization in the matching system. Everyone who isn't placed through the matching system, will be put on the waiting list automatically. If a spot becomes vacant, a random pick for the waiting list will be informed. Please understand that we are unable to answer any requests outside the matching system due to high demand. Contact: Mr. Dian Balta http://www.fortiss.org/ueber-uns/mitarbeiter/dian-balta/ .

Objectives

After the course, you are able to explain the basic concepts behind the blockchain technology, to compare blockchain systems and to develop applications in a specific system according to user requirements. You will be taught how to evaluate blockchain prototypes and how to demonstrate your own design. Also, you will learn to work effectively in a team to develop a solution design and implement it as a prototype.

Description

The potential of blockchain systems continues beyond cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin (Swan 2015): intelligent contracts (Qatar 2014), decentralized autonomous organizations (Jentzsch) or new governance systems (Reijers et al., 2016). The innovation potential for the redesign and management of processes is recognizable (Mendling et al., 2017) and can be applied to various domains. The example of the public administration states that all forms of registers that have a publicly verifiable transaction history and whose content can be manipulated are basically suitable for a blockchain implementation (Dapp / Balta / Krcmar 2017). Another example contribution to the energy provider: Power generation and use are increasingly decentralized and follow, for example, smart homes in a position to more recently on the power network participants, without becoming dependent on a provider. In this course you will get an introduction to the basic concepts (Wattenhofer 2016), an overview of blockchain systems currently used in practice, as well as a technical introduction to two systems, Ethereum, Hyperledger Fabric and BigchainDB. The concepts of the practices for the collection of the consultants of the consultants of the consultants. In the second part of a group "challenges" from the domain public administration / energy / manufacturing / supply chains work and prototypically develop and demonstrate a solution. For this time, a hackathon is planned, another guest lectures and the intermediate presentation will be after the time (by appointment). The results will be used further: Successful groups will be given the opportunity to participate in an experiment in an experimental room, where a prototype of a test position will be implemented.

Prerequisites

Basic (non-blockchain) programming skills are expected, knowledge of cryptography or distributed systems are helpful. Spoken language is German, materials are in German and English.

Teaching and learning methods

Homework during introduction phase (optional). Course project work will be done in groups.

Examination

Presentation of concept/deisgn, demonstration of prototype, submission of report

Recommended literature

Buterin V (2014) Ethereum White Paper. In: GitHub. https://github.com/ethereum/wiki/wiki/White-Paper. Dapp, M; Balta, D.; Krcmar, H. (2017) “Blockchain – Disruption der öffentlichen Verwaltung? Eine Technologie zur Neugestaltung der Verwaltungsprozesse” Jentzsch C Decentralized Autonomous Organization to automate Governance. Mendling, J.; Weber, I.; van der Aalst, W.; vom Brocke, J.; Cabanillas, C.; Daniel, F.; Debois, S.; Di Ciccio, C.; Dumas, M.; Dustdar, S.; Gal, A.; Garcia-Banuelos, L,; Governatori, G.; Hull, R.; La Rosa, M.; Leopold, H.; Leymann, F.; Recker, J.; Reichert, M.; Reijers, H.A.; Rinderle-Ma, S.; Rogge-Solti, A.; Rosemann, M.; Schulte, S.; Singh, M.P.; Slaats, T.; Staples, M.; Weber, B.; Weidlich, M.; Weske, M.; Xu, X.; Zhu, L. (2017) “Blockchains for Business Process Management - Challenges and Opportunities” Reijers W, O’Brolcháin F, Haynes P (2016) Governance in Blockchain Technologies & Social Contract Theories. Ledger 1:134–151. doi: 10.5195/ledger.2016.62 Swan M (2015) Blockchain: blueprint for a new economy. Wattenhofer R (2016) The science of the blockchain

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